Why Pokémon Fans Should Check Out Pokémon Tabletop United

Like role-playing games such as Dungeons & Dragons continue to grow in popularity, now is a better time than ever for other franchises to get into role-playing games. Although not officially part of the Pokemon franchise, Pokemon Tabletop United is a fun tabletop role-playing game that defines itself as more than just “Pokemon D&D.” Due to its fan-made creation and the fact that there has been no new content lately while the developers are working on the next edition, many fans of the Pokemon series may not be aware of this fantastic role-playing game.


Pokemon Tabletop United 1.05, the last major installment of the system, was released in 2015. A handful of playtest packs and other supplements were released over the next year, along with additions to the Pokédex as new games were released. new Pokémon sets have been released. That’s probably all the system can expect to receive until the next edition of the game is finally released, but in the meantime, the game isn’t missing at all as is.

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A major aspect of UTP is the freedom players have to create a personalized experience. Not only do players create the characters they play as, but they also create individual character sheets for their Pokémon as they acquire them throughout the game. Although this requires players to juggle multiple character sheets as the game progresses, this allows for increased customization.


Each Pokemon can have at least six moves and multiple abilities at once, creating a baseline that allows players to tell Pokemon apart from each other. With more choices given to players over their stat distribution, even two different Pokemon of the same species can look drastically different. This diversity between Pokémon sets increases even more when trainer classes are involved, as many allow for new abilities, moves, and features that can make each Pokémon unique.

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The player character, most commonly a trainer in the game, has plenty of customization options, as there are over 50 classes to choose from between the core rulebook and supplements. This does not include subclasses that fall under a handful of these classes, such as Type Aces. Each trainer can have up to four classes, and the game encourages players to mix and match different classes and features to create the perfect player character. When mixed with a player’s companion Pokémon, no character is ever quite the same.


Another draw for UTP is that it stays true to the mainline combat system Pokemon video games. Like any Pokemon game would, it uses turn-based combat based on the speed stat. Also, a lot of UTPMoves and abilities work the same way, though many receive much-needed buffs to allow more Pokemon to be usable alongside even the strongest Pokemon.

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That’s not to say there aren’t winners and losers when it comes to the system, as some Pokemon are significantly better. However, the system leaves no Pokémon behind and allows everyone to find a use, even in the highest levels of play. This is mixed with additional maneuvers and actions players can take in combat, each having a limited but powerful effect that allows players who diversify their social skills to maintain their unique strengths in combat. They even have rules for running Pokémon contests if that’s of interest to fans reviewing the system.


All fans of the Pokemon franchise interested in trying out a Pokemon-Themed TTRPG need look no further than Pokemon Tabletop United. It’s an ideal choice for anyone looking for a system that varies from the tastes of Dungeons & Dragons and Scout. Although it seems overwhelming at first, UTP makes for a deceptively easy introduction, making it perfect for longtime fans of Pokemon as well as newcomers.


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