LRC Fort Greely featured on Army eSports team | Item

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The US Army’s Warhammer esports team fielded two teams of five at a recent tournament in Las Vegas. The Army’s eSports program began in 2019 to attract new recruits. Originally open only to soldiers on active and reserve duty, some teams now include civilians and veterans from the Department of the Armed Forces.
(Photo credit: Katie Nelson)

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Tim Huebscher, left, competes in a Warhammer tournament in Las Vegas as a member of the U.S. Army Warhammer eSports team.  Huebscher, a material handler at the Logistics Readiness Center in Fort Greely, Alaska, enjoys this tabletop strategy game because of his mental commitment and is proud to represent the military in the gaming community.








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Tim Huebscher, left, competes in a Warhammer tournament in Las Vegas as a member of the U.S. Army Warhammer eSports team. Huebscher, a material handler at the Logistics Readiness Center in Fort Greely, Alaska, enjoys this tabletop strategy game because of his mental commitment and is proud to represent the military in the gaming community.
(Photo credit: US Army)

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A member of the 402nd Army Field Support Battalion-Alaska’s LRC at Ft. Greely is one of the newest members of the official U.S. Army esports team. Tim Huebscher works as a material handler at the Logistics Readiness Center, commonly known as LRC, in Fort Greely, Alaska.

“I have played competitively for the past five years and have already played with many soldiers who have been stationed in Alaska,” said Huebscher, who competed with his first Army eSports team at the time. from a recent Warhammer tournament in Las Vegas.

Warhammer is a tabletop strategy game, which means players compete in person rather than online. The goal of Warhammer is to eliminate opposing units, control various objectives, and meet varying victory conditions, according to Huebscher.

“The game is very mentally engaging, with an ever-changing playing environment; you have to stay strategically ahead of your opponents, ”Huebscher said. “Knowledge, planning and preparation are essential. Seventy percent of the games can be won or lost before the first move, the rest is just dice.

The military announced the eSports program in 2019 as a way to attract new recruits. Originally open only to soldiers on active and reserve duty, some teams now include civilians and veterans from the Department of the Armed Forces.

“I was contacted by one of the current members of the Army team, telling me that there were places for civilians and veterans for the tournament in Las Vegas,” Huebscher said.

Huebscher was selected to be part of one of the Army’s two teams and compete against 60 teams from around the world.

In the tournament, Huebscher’s team finished 31st while the other army team finished 24th. Both teams finished the weekend with three wins and three losses in total. According to Huebscher, these results were very respectable given that this type of team tournament was a first for teams.

“It was great to be there, and there were more familiar faces than I had imagined,” Huebscher said. “I passed half the members of the Army teams.

Huebscher says he likes the collision of his two passions. At LRC Fort. Greely, Huebscher is involved in training and mission support.

“The troops can use me as a local resource. I give them a better idea of ​​what works and what doesn’t in the interior of Alaska, ”Huebscher said. “I have met soldiers that I play with when they are in the Donnelly training area, where our LRC provides ongoing support to units. “

In the days following the tournament, Huebscher was officially invited to join the Warhammer Army team on a permanent basis.

“The military community is really like one big extended family and I look forward to representing the military in the gaming community.”


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